The Ability of an MDI to Diagnose Pain

MDIs or Multidirectional Instability injuries are highly common afflictions that occur both as the result of significant trauma and simply in general. Looking at an MDI to diagnose pain can be like trying to find a needle in a haystack; only by getting to the root of the problem through a proper physical assessment can pain be properly assessed and treated.

What is MDI?

MDI or Multidirectional Instability is a common affliction of the shoulder. It is a joint disorder than can impact anyone –not just those who have experienced trauma or who have dislocated their shoulder, as many commonly believe. Realistically, MDI can afflict anyone who has not used or who has recently started extensively using his or her shoulder joints after a period of non-use.

The result is a sense of looseness or laxity in which the shoulder joint might be subject so sliding in and out of place (hence the assumption about dislocation).

Diagnosing Pain with an MDI

Problematically, MDI pain is somewhat indistinguishable from other forms of pain. For example, signs and symptoms of an MDI:

  • Pain is typically experienced during an activity
  • Pain when lifting or moving objects
  • Pain during or following exercise
  • A sensation of weakness
  • A sensation of shoulder movement
  • Popping or clicking in the shoulder when movement occurs
  • Tingling or numbing to the afflicted arm
  • Fatigue following activity
  • Loss of performance

It is for these reasons –the fact that the problem can so easily masquerade as something else, that a proper diagnosis is necessary. Only through a targeted discussion regarding the pain and with a detailed physical examination can a proper diagnosis be achieved.

Selecting the Right Care

Respective to diagnosis and treatment, it is essential to take your concerns to the correct type of doctor for your ailment. Just as you wouldn’t seek input from a cardiologist regarding a suspicious mole on your forearm, you should also not consult an internist or surgeon or any other type of specialist regarding physical pain other than an orthopedist.

While these medical doctors are very skilled in their areas of expertise, they have a tendency to misdiagnose ailments due to their exclusive reliance on imaging technologies like MRI and X-ray. While imaging is useful in assisting a diagnosis, it should not be the only resource (as is often the case among non-orthopedic professionals).

Further, pain medication and / or surgery are often the prescribed treatment solutions among some medical professionals. This, too, is problematic. Treatment through physical therapy, which is the result of an accurate diagnosis of the cause of pain, is both safer and more effective.

At the Orthopedic & Sports Physical Therapy Center in Florida, your MDI pain will be treated with proper attention and respect. Our mission is to diagnose the source of your pain using a series of healthy, noninvasive assessments proven to adequately understand what is causing your pain and further—to understand the cause of your MDI so continued injury and pain can be avoided.

At OSPTC, we listen to you and invite you to be a participant in your healing and recovery process. If you’re ready to stop hurting, come see the wise, experienced, and conscientious health professionals at OSPTC.

With four locations from Crestview to Destin, Florida, the Orthopedic & Sports Physical Therapy Center is the place to go for sports injuries and for expedient therapeutic recovery. The careful, respectful, and attentive physical assessment of the causes of pain is a specialty of the professionals at Orthopedic & Sports Physical Therapy Center, LLC. Their experienced, comprehensive approach to pain diagnosis and treatment will have you feeling better, longer in no time.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s